brain cream

ozdal:

Glico being very gentle with my anniversary flowers :)

Each dollar counts. For every dollar increase in the wage, the share of workers receiving benefits is shaved by 3.9 percentage points and the benefits that an average worker relies on falls by $126 a year.
Hate government spending? Then you should love a higher minimum wage.

via think-progress (via amprog)

Dylan Moran - Like, Totally.

libutron:

Milky Way over Madagascar | ©Andreas Liem
 
pricklylegs:

Take a look through the pic gallery Donny`s

pricklylegs:

Take a look through the pic gallery Donny`s

profeminist:

Double standard, illustrated.

profeminist:

Double standard, illustrated.

When a local government’s very existence depends on its citizens breaking the law — when fines from ordinance violations are written into city budgets for the upcoming year as a primary or even the main expected source of revenue — the relationship between the government and the governed is not one of public officials serving their constituents, but of preying off of them. When the primary mission of a police department isn’t to protect citizens but to extract money from them, and when the cops themselves don’t look like, live near or have much in common with the people from whom they’re extracting that money, you get cops who start to see the people they’re supposed to be serving not as citizens with rights, but as potential sources of revenue, as lawbreakers to be caught. The residents of these towns then see cops not as public servants drawn from their own community to enforce the laws and keep the peace, but as outsiders brought in to harass them, whose salaries are drawn from that harassment. The same goes for the judges and prosecutors, who also rarely live in the towns that employ them.

mashable:

Astronaut Chris Hadfield recently wrote a post for Mashable about what it’s like to orbit the earth.

In just 92 minutes we go all the way around, incredulously gazing on place after place, barely known and only dreamed of. The colors and textures pour underneath, a refilling kaleidoscope of delight. Over the months in space that followed, I took thousands of photos to capture and remember it. My book You Are Here is the best of those photos — my guided tour of our planet, as if we were floating and looking out the spaceship window together. Here are a few.

[via]